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  1. #1
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    Leash less tools (leashed)

    The question of tool leashes may of popped up in the past, please excuse me for missing the thread if it has been covered.

    I've been climbing leash less for some time and seem to like the freedom and ease of switching over from tool to tool, shaking out and placing screws.
    However, I've almost dropped my tool a few times.

    My partners and I have discussed tying our tools into our harness via cord(s) which will be a few inches longer then I can reach.

    This system would offer a few safety catches such as not dropping the tool, resting when pumped out and catching a fall.

    Just wondering if anyone has tried this style of leashing up?
    Thanks

  2. #2
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    This has been a style used for a long long time. I have used a homemade version and the BD spinner while on mountain routes.

    That being said, I would not count on them as an option for catching a fall. I also would not want to rest on them since you won't be able to reach the tools when they're fully expanded.

    searching "umbilical" on http://coldthistle.blogspot.com/ will yield a lot of good information.

    Out of curiosity, in what situations are you almost dropping your tools?
    Last edited by pcooke; 12-31-2011 at 04:06 PM.

  3. #3
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    pcookie
    Thanks ,I tried the link but not being to computer savvy wasn't able to come up with a search option.

    I know and climbed with many climbers on NEice and just threw my question out. If I can get some fellow climbers to share their experiences I would then receive a wealth of information, the positive and negative of the umbilical system.
    I've read some great stuff on NEice for a long long long long time. I've also witnessed a few suggestions which were stomped on by the elitist group in NEice, the stomped on information when applied actually saved a few climbers from a trip to the hospital or worse.


    I would not count on the umbilical to catch a fall either, but I would think there may be a chance the system WILL catch a fall, which is better then nothing. In a rest/shake out situation one hand is on the tool the other hand is at rest, shaking it out. What if that one tool(the tool with your hand on) pops? I wouldn't count on the umbilical-ed tool to catch me, but it's better then nothing. I don't count on frozen water to hold me but it does.......sometimes.


    ((
    Out of curiosity, in what situations are you almost dropping your tools?))
    Came close a few times as would happen to most climbers, nothing special, just pumped out, frozen gloves, placing my tool down on a ledge while dry tooling, getting hit in the head (helmet) by a chunk of ice while my tool is around my neck/shoulder.
    I just plain wouldn't want to drop my tool and with the umbilical style I would still have the leash less freedom, I think, not sure yet.

    So, back to my question, Just wondering if anyone has tried this style of leashing up?
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JERKIS MACFARTIN View Post
    pcookie
    Thanks ,I tried the link but not being to computer savvy wasn't able to come up with a search option.

    I know and climbed with many climbers on NEice and just threw my question out. If I can get some fellow climbers to share their experiences I would then receive a wealth of information, the positive and negative of the umbilical system.
    I've read some great stuff on NEice for a long long long long time. I've also witnessed a few suggestions which were stomped on by the elitist group in NEice, the stomped on information when applied actually saved a few climbers from a trip to the hospital or worse.


    I would not count on the umbilical to catch a fall either, but I would think there may be a chance the system WILL catch a fall, which is better then nothing. In a rest/shake out situation one hand is on the tool the other hand is at rest, shaking it out. What if that one tool(the tool with your hand on) pops? I wouldn't count on the umbilical-ed tool to catch me, but it's better then nothing. I don't count on frozen water to hold me but it does.......sometimes.


    ((
    Out of curiosity, in what situations are you almost dropping your tools?))
    Came close a few times as would happen to most climbers, nothing special, just pumped out, frozen gloves, placing my tool down on a ledge while dry tooling, getting hit in the head (helmet) by a chunk of ice while my tool is around my neck/shoulder.
    I just plain wouldn't want to drop my tool and with the umbilical style I would still have the leash less freedom, I think, not sure yet.

    So, back to my question, Just wondering if anyone has tried this style of leashing up?
    Thanks
    I used the Black Diamond spinners for the first time a couple weeks ago on the Dike. They got stuck on one piece of ice at waste level on one occasion. I had to shuffle a bit and set myself up to reach down and untangle it. No big deal really.

    All in all i never really noticed i had em. I suppose being i was following i noticed them getting on the wrong side of the rope a couple times also, i suppose that also depends on how you look at what is the right and wrong side of the rope.

    I will probably always climb with them from now on. At least on longer routes and climbing solo.

    Good luck and let the haters hate lol.... Every sport has it's elitist ass holes. Mosta the time if you stick around long enough you find they are Monday morning quarterbacks for the most part. Some are just A holes. But you can find an A hole anywhere you poke your head out right.

  5. #5
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    I just tried out my homeade version today. I used teathers way BINTD and did get tangled up a few times so I resisted them this time arround. I have been carrying a 3rd tool and my thought was that he teathers would allow me to leave that third tool @ home and go lighter. I switched to Quarks so no longer have to worry about BD pick breakage so the 3rd tool it mostly in case of droppage especially on mixed ground.

    Climbed with teathers today and I found that leading you have to pay attention to how you clip to avoid z clipping your teather under the gear. Following you can get wrapped arround the rope but not as big a deal. I did take a top rope fall on a mixed route and the tool stayed stuck with the ax on great tension looking like a fully drawn cross bow aiming at my head. i did one quick move to unweight that thing and get that bullseye off my head!
    Conclusions after one day of climbing.
    Soloing. Awsome system! relieves the stress of dropping a tool and allows you to be more relaxed and not carry the weight of a spare tool. leading and following the jury is still out. My system is tied to my tools so it is not a fast easy switch from on to off after those knots have been wet and tightened.

  6. #6
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    Now that's what I call good first hand information, I would of never thought of umbilical line hanging up or mixing with the rope..........but now I can visualize it happening.
    Think I'll start on TR and try to work out the kinks.

    Any more users?

  7. #7
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    I've been experimenting with the BD Spinner the last few days out. I was convinced going in to it that I would dislike them, but I too hate carrying a third tool, and would really hate droping a tool. I haven't done so (or even come close) on anything other than single pitch drytool silliness yet, but I figure it's bound to happen eventually.

    I've found the Spinners to work very well. I don't really even notice them leading, though I did take note of the possibility of tangling them with the lead line when clipping as Tradman points out. It's easy to avoid, but something to be aware of.

    When seconding, they definitely have a tendency to twist around the rope above you, and this issue is exacerbated when using doubles or twins. This doesn't seem like a big deal to me. I just climb through to a decent stance and untwist. No problem, really.

    One more awkward issue is worth noting: They are very annoying when climbing snow and plunging the shafts. You can do it, but I quickly developed the habit of unclipping them for any real snow climbing. I've heard of people alleviating this by attaching them to the heads of their tools, but this seems like a bad idea for many reasons, and I personally would not do so.

    I plan on continuing to use them. The peace of mind about dropped tools has thus far significantly outweighed any minor issues. YMMV.

  8. #8
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    Derick How are they clipped to your tools where you can do a fast disconnect? I simply Tied 4mm cord to the hole near the spike on my Quarks and then clipped the other end to my belay loop with small biners.

  9. #9
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    Thanks, seems I can almost feel the umbilical style climbing from your experiences, especially a loaded stuck tool, can't wait.

    Has anybody experimented with adjusting the length of the umbilical? Or what length works for you?

  10. #10
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    I figured out what would work when I was making mine. nailed it perfectly.

    Useing the Teathers for soloing is almost a no brainer. You do also haved to be carefull highstepping over the top of a bulge if you are useing the ax in Piolet canne.

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